Article | European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults | Adult education and reflexive activation: prioritising recognition, respect, dignity and capital accumulation

Title:
Adult education and reflexive activation: prioritising recognition, respect, dignity and capital accumulation
Author:
Séamus Ó Tuama: University College Cork, Ireland
DOI:
10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0172
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Full article (pdf)
Year:
2016
Volume:
7
Issue:
1
Pages:
107-118
No. of pages:
12
Publication type:
Article
Published:
2016-03-16


The economic crisis that emerged in 2008 put great stress on the so-called European project. The economic downturn put additional pressure on economically and educationally marginalised populations, who continue to experience high levels of unemployment and lower levels of access to societal goods. Activation is seen as one of the main strategies to combat unemployment. The EU also recognises a systemic shift in the nature of work, such that individuals will have several transitions between work and education during their careers. This is a significant societal level challenge that will likely pose greater stress on groups and individuals that are marginalised socially, educationally and economically. To deliver better long-term outcome it is necessary to adopt reflexive activation approaches. Reflexive activation is one in which unemployed people actively co-design the proposed resolutions. It is also embedded in a societal context. It is cognisant of citizenship, autonomy and human rights and leans towards traditional adult education values. The model of reflexive activation explored here is infused with understandings emerging from Schuller’s three types of capital and theories of recognition, respect and dignity developed by Honneth and others.

Keywords: Reflexive activation; respect; human capital; social capital; identity capital

Volume 7, Issue: 1, Article 8, 2016

Author:
Séamus Ó Tuama
Title:
Adult education and reflexive activation: prioritising recognition, respect, dignity and capital accumulation:
DOI:
10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0172
References:

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Volume 7, Issue: 1, Article 8, 2016

Author:
Séamus Ó Tuama
Title:
Adult education and reflexive activation: prioritising recognition, respect, dignity and capital accumulation:
DOI:
10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0172
Note: the following are taken directly from CrossRef
Citations:
  • Christine Zeuner (2013). From workers education to societal competencies: Approaches to a critical, emancipatory education for democracy. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, 4(2): 139. DOI: 10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela9011
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