Article | European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults | Political globalization and the shift from adult education to lifelong learning

Title:
Political globalization and the shift from adult education to lifelong learning
Author:
Marcella Milana: Aarhus University, Denmark
DOI:
10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0070
Read article:
Full article (pdf)
Year:
2012
Volume:
3
Issue:
2
Pages:
103-117
No. of pages:
15
Publication type:
Article
Published:
2012-11-09


This article reflects on the shift in vocabulary from (adult and continuing) education to (lifelong) learning and the ideological and purposive orientations it carries. It does so by critically addressing the changes occurred in policy discourses concerned with the education of adults after WWII at transnational level. The main argument is that the shift in vocabulary has been favoured by an increased voice acquired by transnational and inter-states entities (i.e. OECD, UNESCO, EU) in educational matters, however in combination with a change in political emphasis, at least within the European Union, from creating jobs opportunities towards securing that citizens acquire marketable skills. While both trends seems to point at the demise of the nation state as a guarantor for social justice, more research is needed to deepen our understandings of the interplay between transnational and nation-state levels; thus the article concludes by suggesting a research agenda to move in this direction.

Keywords: Lifelong learning; adult education; OECD; UNESCO; EU

Volume 3, Issue: 2, Article 2, 2012

Author:
Marcella Milana
Title:
Political globalization and the shift from adult education to lifelong learning:
DOI:
10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0070
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Volume 3, Issue: 2, Article 2, 2012

Author:
Marcella Milana
Title:
Political globalization and the shift from adult education to lifelong learning:
DOI:
10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0070
Note: the following are taken directly from CrossRef
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  • Ellen Boeren (2017). Researching lifelong learning participation through an interdisciplinary lens. International Journal of Research & Method in Education, 40(3): 299. DOI: 10.1080/1743727X.2017.1287893
  • Carlos Alberto Torres (2013). Neoliberalism as a new historical bloc: a Gramscian analysis of neoliberalism’s common sense in education. International Studies in Sociology of Education, 23(2): 80. DOI: 10.1080/09620214.2013.790658
  • Jessica Gerrard (2015). The limits of learning: homelessness and educating the employable self. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 36(1): 69. DOI: 10.1080/01596306.2013.831661
  • Cecilia Bjursell (2016). When theories become practice - a metaphorical analysis of adult-education school-leaders� talk. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, 7(2): 191. DOI: 10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela9084
  • Barry Hake (2016). Regulatory governance of 'training markets', 'market failure', and 'quasi' markets: historical dimensions of the post-initial training market in The Netherlands. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, 7(2): 171. DOI: 10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela9080
  • Borut Mikule & Sabina Jelenc Krašovec (2016). Marketising Slovene adult education policies and practices using mechanisms of the Europeanisation of education. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, 7(2): 151. DOI: 10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela9081
  • Marcella Milana (2016). Global polity in adult education and UNESCO: landmarking, brokering and framing policy. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 14(2): 203. DOI: 10.1080/14767724.2015.1010437
  • Andreas Feje & Henning Salling Olesen (2016). Editorial: marketization and commodification of adult education. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, 7(2): 146. DOI: 10.3384/rela.2000-7426.relae12
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