Article | European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults | Life history approaches to access and retention of nontraditional students in higher education: A cross-European approach

Title:
Life history approaches to access and retention of nontraditional students in higher education: A cross-European approach
Author:
John Field: University of Stirling, Scotland Barbara Merrill: University of Warwick, England Linden West: Canterbury Christ Church University, England
DOI:
10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0062
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Year:
2012
Volume:
3
Issue:
1
Pages:
77-89
No. of pages:
13
Publication type:
Article
Published:
2012-04-04


Higher education participation has become an important focus for policy debate as well as for scholarly research. Partly this results from ongoing attempts to expand the higher education system in line with wider policies promoting a ’knowledge economy’; and partly it results from widespread policy concerns for equity and inclusion. In both cases, researchers and policymakers alike have tended to focus on access and entry to the system, with much less attention being paid to the distribution of outcomes from the system. This paper reports on a multi-country study that was aimed at critically understanding the experiences of non-traditional students in higher education, and in particular on the factors that helped promote retention. In doing so, the study straddles the sociology of social reproduction and the psychosociology of learner transformations.

Keywords: Higher education; adult students; retention; Bourdieu; Winnicott

Volume 3, Issue: 1, Article 6, 2012

Author:
John Field, Barbara Merrill, Linden West
Title:
Life history approaches to access and retention of nontraditional students in higher education: A cross-European approach:
DOI:
10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0062
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Volume 3, Issue: 1, Article 6, 2012

Author:
John Field, Barbara Merrill, Linden West
Title:
Life history approaches to access and retention of nontraditional students in higher education: A cross-European approach:
DOI:
10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0062
Note: the following are taken directly from CrossRef
Citations:
  • Rob Evans (2013). Learning and knowing: Narratives, memory and biographical knowledge in interview interaction. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, 4(1): 17. DOI: 10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0092
  • Juan Carlos Pita Castro (2014). The transition from initial vocational training to the world of work: the case of art school students. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, 5(1): 111. DOI: 10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0107
  • Susana Ambrósio, Maria Helena Araújo e S & Ana Raquel Simões (2014). The Role of Universities in the Development of Plurilingual Repertoires: The Voices of Non-traditional Adult Students. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 142: 12. DOI: 10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.07.579
  • Lucilia Santos, Joana Bago, Ana V. Baptista, Susana Ambrósio, Henrique M.A.C. Fonsec & Helena Quintas (2016). Academic success of mature students in higher education: a Portuguese case study. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, 7(1): 57. DOI: 10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela9079
  • Juan Carlos Pita Castro (2015). Social gravities and artistic training paths: the artistic vocation viewed through the prism of the concept of temporal form of causality. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, 6(2): 191. DOI: 10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela0146
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